Child protection orders

A list of types of protection orders the department uses along with a brief summary of when they would be applied.

Details of all the available protection orders can be found on the Child Protection Manual website.

  • Care by Secretary order

    The magistrate at the Children's Court has made a Care by Secretary order in relation to the child. This means the magistrate has granted the Secretary to the department sole custody of the child as the child needs protection.

    The Child Protection Manual website has more information on the care by Secretary order.

  • Custody to third party order

    A Custody to Third Party Order has been made to protect the child. The aim of the order is to safely reunite the child with their parents before the order ends.

    The Child Protection Manual website has more information on the custody to third party order.

  • Guardianship to secretary order

    The magistrate at the Children's Court has made the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (the department) the child's guardian. This means that most of the parental legal rights and responsibilities have been transferred for the length of the order to the department. The department is now responsible for looking after the child and making important decisions for them.

  • Interim accommodation order

    An Interim Accommodation Order is an order that the Children's Court issues to say where the child must live until the next court date. This order is made when the Children's Court magistrate believes that there are some problems with the child’s safety and wellbeing that need to be resolved.

    The Child Protection Manual website has more information on the interim accommodation order.

  • Interim protection order

    An Interim Protection Order is made by the magistrate at the Children's Court. It places the child under the supervision of the Department of Health and Human Services for a period of up to 3 months.

    The Child Protection Manual website has more information on the interim protection order.

  • Long term care order

    The magistrate at the Children's Court has made the Secretary to the the department responsible for the child's care as their long term guardian. This means that most of the parental legal rights and responsibilities have been transferred to the department, for the length of the order. The department is now responsible for looking after the child including making important decisions for them, in the long term.

    The Child Protection Manual website has more information on the long term care order.

  • Temporary assessment order

    Child Protection workers from the department have applied to the Children's Court for a temporary assessment order, to allow them to investigate reports that the child is at risk of harm.

    The Child Protection Manual website has more information on the temporary assessment order.

  • Review of a child protection decision

    A Child Protection worker is working with both parents and child to assess the care and safety of the child, and to develop a case plan. The case plan outlines what needs to be done to make sure the child is safe from harm.

    The Child protection manual website has more information on the review of child protection decisions.

  • The Children's Court

    After visiting a family, a Child Protection worker from the department is concerned that a child is not getting the care they need and is at risk of harm.

    The Child protection manual website has more information on the Children's court.

  • Undertakings

    An undertaking is a Protection Order made by the magistrate because they believe that the parent(s) had some problems caring for their child.

  • When child protection workers visit

    Someone has made a report to the the department that a child may be at risk of harm in parental care. The Children Youth and Families Act 2005 requires Child Protection workers from the department to investigate this report.

    When Child Protection workers visit information sheet can be found on the First visit for you people page on the Child Protection Manual website.